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outfitting zones and lodges
Outfitting zones and lodges

In summer, the Sahtu becomes a mecca for adventurers from other places. These people are seeking to experience the scenery and wildlife of one of the world's last great wildernesses. Increasingly, these people are having an impact on the economy of the Sahtu.

Overall, tourism has been expanding. Hunting and fishing has historically been the strongest sector in the tourism business. However, the popularity of canoeing, kayaking and hiking has been growing in recent years. Americans and Europeans in particular are attracted by the cheap dollar. As well, word has been spreading about the outstanding experience and services available in the Sahtu.

The logistics of transporting people into the area by air can be costly. But the number of tourists is proportionately smaller. This enhances the wilderness experience, and reduces the social and environmental impacts.

Tourism can have a stabilizing influence on the regional economy, being less subject to the fluctuations of the petroleum industry. Tourism tends to provide significant jobs over a long period of time. One dollar spent by a tourist in the region generates about $3 of business on average.

spring hunt a family tradition

Spring Hunt A Family Tradition

By Teri Bavard, Aurora College, Tulita

The dictionary says that a tradition is a belief or custom which is handed down from generation to generation. In some families, it is a tradition to open presents after the midnight mass on Christmas Eve, or to eat turkey and have the family over on Thanksgiving.

My family has many customs and traditions. One that I especially like is the tradition of going out on the land for spring hunt.

In April, when it is early spring, our family and relatives get together and help each other to go to the campsite up the Mackenzie River before the ice melts. We use the skidoo to take the things in the bush. After breakup, we return to town by boat. It takes just one day to get there.

The tradition of spring hunt is carried on from our ancestors. At least that is what I believe. Following the old ways, many of the people of our community still go out on the land. Traditions are important because it is a way of keeping families together and being there for each other.

We like it out on the land. It is a lot of work, but we enjoy being out on the land with the fresh air. There are many things to do, such as setting snares or just going for a walk to see the beautiful scenery.

I really enjoy the bush, and it is good to know that my children are learning how to live on the land. I especially like the quietness and the peacefulness, and listening to the birds sing. It is a wonderful feeling to experience. You feel free out there on the land.

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